Authors Talk About It

Book Award Contest & Podcast

Category: Fiction (Page 1 of 17)

Jorie and the Magic Stones – Entered in 2017 ATAI Book Award Contest

5 Stars

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A. H. Richardson

In A. H. Richardson’s Jorie and the Magic Stones, Marjorie Weaver, who prefers to be called Jorie, is a spunky almost-nine-year-old with a personality as bright as her long red hair. After going to live with her aunt in the intimidating Mortimer Manor, Jorie discovers a mysterious book about dragons under the floorboards of her room. Soon after, she finds herself magically transported to the mystical land of Cabrynthius. There, Jorie discovers that she is the prophesied “Child with the Hair of Fire,” who must locate the three Stones of Maalog and return them to the great dragon, Grootmonya. She returns with her friend, Rufus, and the two children then embark on an imaginative adventure, full of dragons, magic, and peril around every corner.

Jorie and the Magic Stones is a wonderfully creative chapter book for children, similar to classics like The Chronicles of Narnia in depth and content. It’s full of complex magic and an alternate world detailed enough to satisfy adult readers, while narrated by the innocent, age-appropriate voice of a child. While Jorie and the Magic Stones does contain themes of darkness and/or evil, it never feels too scary. Rather, it promotes kindness, intelligence, creativity, and perseverance in a manner that is both straightforward and thought-provoking.

A. H. Richardson’s descriptive writing style and pure creativity made Jorie and the Magic Stones a pure joy to read. It’s exciting and immersive, and chock full of humor, adventure, and magic that will thrill readers of all ages. Although it is meant to be a children’s book, Jorie and the Magic Stones is the type of exhilarating fantasy book that the whole family will enjoy.

Originally critiqued by a member of the Authors Talk About It team.

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There’s a Goat in My Oatmeal – Entered in 2017 ATAI Book Award Contest

4 Stars

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Jeff Whitcher

A classic perspective on humorous children’s poetry, There’s a Goat In My Oatmeal: Poems and Drawings by Jeff Whitcher is quite delightful.  Throughout the book, readers will discover whimsical concepts interwoven throughout the poetry.  More often than not, the author writes with a rhyming cadence.  However, the reader will encounter a few oddities tossed in along the way.  Those ”interesting facts” pop up only a time or two, but they seem somewhat out of context and break the flow of the rest of the book.  That shouldn’t deter potential readers though.  If those feel incongruent with the rest of the book, just skip over them.  Beyond the comical approach to the poetry, author Jeff Whitcher has also included a number of entertaining sketches that will grab the reader’s attention and bring a smile to his or her lips.

Some of the poetry seems to come from the view of a child whereas other poems seem to come from the view of a parent.  That can be a bit confusing initially, but many of them will still bring a giggle bubbling to the surface.  There’s a Goat in My Oatmeal as a whole and the poem with the same title as the book’s title are great to read to one’s children outloud, and they are great poems for younger readers to explore on their own.  Witcher looks at things and events through a very interesting lens.  For example, he writes about “The Old Woman and the Shoe”, and yes, she is the old woman from the traditional nursery rhyme, but reading about her from Witcher’s view is very cute and as mentioned above will likely bring a smile and giggle if not a full belly laugh from young readers.  There’s a Goat in My Oatmeal would make a nice addition to one’s family library as well as local libraries’ children’s sections.

Originally critiqued by a member of the Authors Talk About It team.

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Chrysalis and Clan – Entered in 2017 ATAI Book Award Contest

5 Stars

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Jae Mazer

In Jae Mazer’s Chrysalis and Clan, Beth thinks she’s on her way to a normal, albeit distressing, visit with her aging mother. However, one cryptic speech and a murder-suicide later, Beth wakes up in a hospital, full of fear and doubt. Who is she? What is she? She’s not so sure anymore. Meanwhile, her daughter, Etta, is caught in a tragedy of her own. A “boogeyman” has ravaged their family, and now, he’s relentlessly hunting her. Etta and Beth must find each other and band together to survive a devastating whirlwind of death, horrifying creatures, and the dark unknown.

Chrysalis and Clan is certainly not a book for the faint-hearted. It is a unique and seamless blend of traditional and modern horror stories, the paranormal, and science-fiction that, although done well, may be a bit too graphic for certain readers. Fans of the horror genre in general, though, are going to love this one. There are a few small plot holes here and there (such as the finer details of the otherworldly beings represented in this book), but none are so gravely detrimental as to ruin the overall reading experience. Rather, Chrysalis and Clan was immediately captivating, and never slowed down from there.

There are two main aspects about this book that make it such a winner for the horror genre, the first of which is Jae Mazer’s impeccable pacing. Chrysalis and Clan’s plot unravels in a manner that is simultaneously methodically mysterious and on-the-edge-of-your-seat exciting. The second winning aspect is the phenomenal use of description. From basic character descriptions to unraveling scenes of carnage and horror, Jae Mazer consistently delivers a vivid, enthralling image with her well-chosen words. Frankly, it is so clearly portrayed that it could make an excellent transition to film, one day. Chrysalis and Clan is a truly thrilling horror novel, one that does justice to its genre while still maintaining its own bone-chilling, expertly concocted individuality.

Originally critiqued by a member of the Authors Talk About It team.

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The Heart of It All – Entered in the 2017 ATAI Book Award Contest

4 Stars

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Weston Mitchel

In Weston Mitchel’s The Heart of It All, Austin Kyle longs to be nothing more than a normal college student. However, after a series of blood transfusions following a car accident, his blood now contains a mysterious, promising cure for cancer. Now, he is extraordinary beyond his wildest imagination, and Dr. Greer knows it. She has been trying to find a cure for cancer, and Austin can help her do just that. Their mission soon becomes a race against the clock, though, as Austin’s girlfriend, Mia, succumbs to her leukemia – which only Austin has the power to save her from. 

The Heart of It All holds a ton of promise, but unfortunately, it falls short in execution. For starters, there is a significant lack of editing to blame; run-on sentences and various other grammatical errors run rampant, distracting from the story itself. Also, The Heart of It All is poorly organized, jumping between time periods, locations, and characters’ perspectives often. A simple prologue about the car accident, then following one character (Austin) throughout the present-day events for the rest of the novel would have served it far better. 

Despite all this, The Heart of It All is still quite an enjoyable read. Its greatest strength is its use of description; Weston Mitchel’s writing style and use of descriptive language was simply wonderful. His characters were intriguing and complex, and the story itself seemed believable and inspiring. The Heart of It All requires extensive improvement to accentuate the great ideas and solid writing, but the incredible potential is already there.

Originally critiqued by a member of the Authors Talk About It team.

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Ancient Blood – Entered in 2017 ATAI Book Award Contest

4 Stars

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Brian McKinley

In Brian McKinley’s Ancient Blood: A Novel of the Hegemony, Avery is obsessed with vampires- their culture, their way of life, their history, everything. After a one-night stand with a woman whom he later realizes is an actual, real-life vampyr, Caroline, he begs her to change him. However, he soon learns that being a vampyr is not as idyllic as it once seemed. Avery and Caroline are hunted, captured, and imprisoned by Caroline’s brutal and ruthless Creator, Sebastian. Together, they must find a way to escape their inhuman captivity, all while reconnecting with their own lingering humanity in the process.

Much of Ancient Blood, although entertaining, seemed far too rushed. Many key plot points were skimmed over or skipped altogether, as if Brian McKinley was constantly in a hurry to get onto the next event in the story. This rushed narrative ultimately harmed the novel in certain areas, most notably in the lack of chemistry between Avery and Caroline. More thorough development and elaboration throughout the story would have been invaluable to Ancient Blood. Instead, in some ways, this novel still reads like an unfinished draft.

Aside from that, Ancient Blood was a most enjoyable horror novel. Its humorous, conversational narrative helped balance out some of the darker aspects of the story. Also, Brian McKinley’s use of descriptive language was stunning; no matter the subject, everything was described thoroughly and vividly. There was plenty of thought and research put into the several “species” of vampires noted in the novel, making the entire book even more captivating. All in all, Ancient Blood: A Novel of the Hegemony could use a fair bit of revision here and there, but it’s already excellent as is. Without ever feeling cliché or tired, Ancient Blood shines a whole new light on the traditional vampire as we know it.

Originally critiqued by a member of the Authors Talk About It team.

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Chameleons: A Novel Based Upon Actual Events – Entered in the 2017 Book Award Contest

4 Stars

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Marcus A. Nannini

In Marcus A. Nannini’s Chameleons, a human skeleton is discovered in Kailua, Hawaii. It is identified as belonging to the engineer of a Japanese midget submarine involved in the attack on Pearl Harbor during World War II. His logbook contains a dark secret: he and the commander of the submarine came ashore afterwards and assimilated themselves into the local Japanese-American population. Navy investigators must race to find the “chameleon” commander, and finally uncover the truth behind a haunting historical mystery.

In some ways, Chameleons feels a bit unbalanced. While the descriptive passages were excellent, much of the dialogue seemed lacking. In some areas, certain characters’ speech was so full of slang and jargon that it was difficult to follow. At other times, the dialogue between characters seemed stiff and unnatural. Considering how interesting other components of this novel are, the awkward dialogue was rather disappointing.

Aside from that, Chameleons was a rather entertaining read. Marcus A. Nannini included a little bit of everything in this well-rounded novel, from history and culture to mystery and drama.  It’s a fascinating and fully immersive recipe that’s full of intricate details and surprising twists. Fans of historical fiction or thrilling mysteries will surely be captivated by Chameleons from its very first page.

Originally critiqued by a member of the Authors Talk About It team.

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Pulse: Book One of the Zoya – Entered in 2017 ATAI Book Award Contest

5 Stars

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Kate Sander

Pulse by Kate Sander is a fantasy novel that offers everything from bloody battles to slow kindred romance. Through alternating narratives, the ultimate battle between the Melanthios and the cruel New King of Languado takes place, and readers are treated to a fully fleshed out world where power struggles take center stage, and strong-willed characters refuse to be stopped. 

Sander is not overly descriptive in her writing and yet her characters and the world slowly take form over the course of the novel. The inclusion of strong female characters in Queen Anita, Senka, and the tortuous Intelligence is refreshing, and Sander does not shy away from giving them vulnerabilities. There are well-choreographed battle scenes, quiet moments between lovers and the well-placed plot twists that will keep readers engaged. Senke is particularly interesting and—although she is mute due to torture—she is a remarkable character who is both protector and natural-born fighter. All of these features team up with clean prose, straightforward language and Sander’s ability to tell a good story. 

The one minor problem with Pulse is the alternative “coma narrative.”  The style reduces a phenomenal story to a clichéd “dream “plot, which in turn diminishes the power of the story. However, this is the first book in a series, and the twist at the end does encourage the reader to wonder how the coma patients Lizzie and Charles are connected to the world of Languado.

Overall, Pulse is a well-written story that deserves praise. It is full of seemingly-real characters, intrigue and back stabbing. Sander has written a great novel that is comparable to the action and strength of the Game of Thrones and Hunger Games series but stands on its own for its creativity and execution. 

Originally critiqued by a member of the Authors Talk About It team.

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Feathers in the Wind – Entered in 2017 Book Award Contest

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Lynn Case

In Lynn Case’s Feathers in the Wind, Catherine is left heartbroken and widowed after the sudden death of her beloved husband, S.J. She does the best she can to move on, ultimately deciding to pursue her dream of owning a ranch in Wyoming. Soon after she moves to Wyoming, however, mysterious events begin to unfold. Cattle are being horrifically slaughtered, and a shadowy stranger is seen lurking around the perimeters of her land. She enlists the help of her ranch hands and a Native American chief to get to the bottom of this mystery, but she soon discovers that there might be more to these events- including S.J.’s death- than meets the eye.

Feathers in the Wind is a bit of a difficult book to read, largely because of its dire need of thorough editing. There was hardly a single sentence in the entire novel that didn’t contain some sort of error. Aside from that, the general narrative was also grossly inconsistent. Painfully slow in some areas and rushing through others, the pacing needs work. Also, the constant shifts in perspective and time frame grew to be confusing rather quickly.

These drawbacks are truly quite a shame, because it’s clear that Lynn Case had an interesting idea in her mind. The bare plot of Feathers in the Wind was intriguing and certainly holds a great deal of potential. It features a unique blend of mystery, drama, and western literature that seems rather promising. The story is there, but it’s not executed nearly as well as it could be. With some comprehensive editing and a bit of fine-tuning, Feathers in the Wind could be an excellent novel. It just needs a bit of help to get there.

Originally critiqued by a member of the Authors Talk About It team.

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Anima: Uncharted Souls – Entered in 2017 Book Award Contest

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Dudley Ellis

Dudley Ellis’ Anima: Uncharted Souls is a paranormal novel in which Melissa Apeeza finds herself in an awakening in an institution with little recognition of how she got there. However, Melissa is no ordinary 10-year-old girl; she posses the astral gift of telekinesis through sight, earning her the name ‘Melissa, Anima of Sight.’ She learns that she’s now a part of the ‘Knights of the Anima: Guardians who posses’ astral gifts.’ Melissa also learns she is not the only one with astral gifts, but that there is a community of people with outstanding astral gifts such as cloning, controlling and reversing feelings and incidents. After one of the older children in the institution rebels and uses his gift of fire to take down most of the institution, Melissa unites with four others who’ve survived the massacre and are now on the hunt for the devil-child who stirred up all of the trouble.

Anima: Uncharted Souls is a rather unsatisfactory ride through the imaginative mind of Dudley Ellis. While it is an interesting genre, Ellis’ execution fell completely flat with incomplete thoughts and poorly described scenes and characters. The poor writing style does very little to grasp the reader’s attention and draw them into what could have been a thrilling paranormal novel. There are some very wide gaps and far too unbelievable storylines in the novel which can become confusing- such as a fairly incomplete background story of the main characters, the fast forwarding to years ahead within a matter of sentences, and the conveniently solved mysteries in the midst of chaos. While the genre is interesting, especially with the “Stranger Things” sensation at play, this book just doesn’t seem to do the genre justice.

Originally critiqued by a member of the Authors Talk About It team.

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Goddess – Entered in 2017 Book Award Contest

4 Stars

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R.J. Castille

Goddess by R.J. Castille is an erotic BDSM novel about Leila and her introduction to, mastery of, and adventures in the lifestyle. While she seems dull and submissive during the day, her life away from the office, as a domme named “Goddess,” commands respects and dedication from her submissive. However, she is put to the test when her strong-willed boss, Gordon Roth, enters her secretive world.

Castille’s writing style is simple yet descriptive. She manages to set up scenes, especially those in the Red Velvet room (a BDSM club), while still leaving space for the reader’s imagination. The story of Leila is more than BDSM; it explores the duality of people and how power plays exist in everyday life. That is not to suggest that the sex scenes are not hot and readers interested in the lifestyle will be met with familiar tropes and BDSM relationships.

The one problem with Goddess is that at times it can read like a “How to “guide on BDSM. While this will give curious first-time readers a chance to better understand BDSM, it could be better woven into the narrative without being so explicit. This not so much a weakness as it is a distraction from the plot.

Overall, Goddess is a novel that is steeped in the BDSM aesthetic. Through the character of Leila, readers are plunged into a world of lust, rich relationships, and tests of wills.  The plot is strong and, coupled with well-written sex scenes, makes a story worth lusting over.

Originally critiqued by a member of the Authors Talk About It team.

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